Native artifact sale in Paris makes $1.6 million ↗

REALLY? No one on my dash has been talking about this at all and it is not okay.

A French auction house, after ignoring a plea by the U.S. Embassy to delay an auction of sacred Hopi masks, sold them briskly Monday along with other contested Native American artifacts for $1.6 million. 

As protesters stood outside the Drouot auction house with banners reading “Sacred Masks, Sacrilegious Sale,” some 25 vividly colored Kachina masks went under the hammer inside.

Though a judge ruled last week that the sale of the artifacts is legal in France, the American Indian Hopi tribe says the artifacts represent their ancestors’ spirits and cannot be sold as merchandise.

Objects sold quickly, including the sacred “Crow Mother,” a menacing Hopi mask with billowing black plumes, that was bought at nearly twice its expected value at $171,000.

"This is the event of the year. It’s right here, right now. This is the American Indian sale of 2013," auctioneer Eric Deneste said light-heartedly. His tone, and the almost comical corncobs scattered for decoration around the masks, were in contrast to the very serious presence of security guards positioned around the room in case of disruption."

CORN COBS FOR DECORATION.

I could not actually finish reading, I got too angry.


thedailyfeed:

Why just donate to a project when you can invest in one? That’s the premise behind Gambitious, a sort of Kickstarter for video games — except Gambitious investors will actually share in the project’s profits.

“Gambitious is the first equity-based, crowd-funding platform that solely concentrates on the video game industry,” Paul Hanraets, the company’s managing director, told The Daily. “Our model is the first of its kind, providing a new way for small and large investors to directly invest in a wide selection of promising game projects, thus taking home a share in any eventual profits from the venture.”

thedailyfeed:

Why just donate to a project when you can invest in one? That’s the premise behind Gambitious, a sort of Kickstarter for video games — except Gambitious investors will actually share in the project’s profits.

“Gambitious is the first equity-based, crowd-funding platform that solely concentrates on the video game industry,” Paul Hanraets, the company’s managing director, told The Daily. “Our model is the first of its kind, providing a new way for small and large investors to directly invest in a wide selection of promising game projects, thus taking home a share in any eventual profits from the venture.”